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2018 October Newsletter

Featured Koi

Showa

Welcome to the newest section of our newsletter. Because so many of our customers are pond and koi owners, we have decided to feature a different breed of koi each month.

We introduced Kohaku last month. For October, we are talking about Showa.

The first Showa was born in 1927, after breeding a Ki Utsuri and a Kohaku. This breed was later improved in 1965 by breeding a female Showa with a male Sanke and a male Kohaku.

Showa are sometimes confused with a Hi Utsuri. Showa are black fish with red and white markings. There must be red and black markings on the head. Showa are known for their vibrant hi (red) and the proportionate sumi (black) and shiroji (white). The markings on these beautiful fish resemble thoughtful brush strokes.

Breeding your Showa with a Kohaku or Sanke will help improve the markings and color.

Lauren says that Showa are a MUST HAVE.

 

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Please note that we’ve updated our newsletter format. You may navigate through this newsletter by clicking on the page numbers below.

Rick Perry installed his first pond in his parents garden when he was only 15 years old! Ponds were built out of concrete back then. His parents still own that home and the original pond has been expanded and rebuilt twice, as the technology in pond liners, pumps, and filters continued to evolve. Rick’s love of water in the garden never went away and for over 16 years he continued to install ponds in his own homes and those of his friends and family. After someone suggested that Rick could make a living off of doing what he loved, Falling Water Designs was born. Rick has been involved in the water garden industry longer than there has been a water garden industry. He is very excited by the continuing innovations that are making it possible for every homeowner to enjoy a low maintenance, affordable water feature in the garden. Rick has been interviewed and featured in Koi World Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and Water Features for Every Garden by Helen Nash.